Dôme by Bernard Judge (1931)

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BERNARD JUDGE



Bernard Judge (born the 9 June, 1931) is an American architect whose work in Southern California and French Polynesia focuses on environmental planning, modern architecture, and historic preservation.

Youth:
Judge was born in New York Judge Hélène Chatelain, painter and anthropologist, and Joseph Michael Judge, architect and dean of Penn State architecture in the years 1930. He spent his childhood in his family home in Fontainbleau, near Paris; Managua, Nicaragua ; and Mexico City. After finishing high school in Forest Hills, New York, he served in the battalions of the US shipbuilding in French Morocco for four years, followed by studying architecture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. He completed his studies in architecture at the’ University of Southern California (where he was influenced by Gregory Ain and its teachers Conrad Buff) in 1960.

Career:
The judge received the initial recognition 1960 when its first project, “The Triponent House”, he built in the Hollywood Hills, was published in several international journals. In 1965, Judge founded his own architectural firm, The Environmental Systems Group, focusing its work on residential and commercial design, preservation and planning of resorts, with particular emphasis on the environment and local culture. He has conducted research on housing in a dozen countries around the world, taught design and lectured on the design of the’ environment at California State University, Long Beach , Californie Polytechnic Institute, Pomone, University of California at Los Angeles , University of Southern California ,Institute of Southern California architecture and University of California, Berkeley . Judge was published in architectural books and design magazines around the world and sent the International Society for studies on coral reefs. His environmental work with Marlon Brando producing director and architectural design plan early 1970 pour Tetiaroa, Tahiti was a defining experience both personally and professionally. Over the years, the host judge received hearings answering his remarks on the project encouraged him to write the book published by ORO editions 2011, Waltzing with Brando.

At Waltzing with Brando, Planing Paradise à Tahiti, Judge recounts his experiences 1970 at 1975 by creating a sustainable village on a group of islands and uninhabited lagoons in the South Pacific for Marlon Brando , who had recently bought Tetiaroa.

The book is an illustrated account of the dynamics of the collaboration between the architect and the client on a rich atoll environmentally and culturally, student life in nature without stripping ecology, archeology or the interdependence of marine life.

best-known work:
In 1968, Bernard Judge was awarded a United States patent for his innovative structural system based on a four-pole, pre-cut residential module. His own home in the Hollywood Hills is based on this construction. His “Triponent House”, a geodesic dome completed in 1962, was Judge’s effort to find an economically sound solution to housing using the finest technology of the day.[2] He called his experimental house “Triponent” for its three intrinsic elements: the envelope, utility core, and interior spaces. The envelope consisted of a 50-foot diameter geodesic dome covered with transparent Mylar, and shaded by photo-electric cells. The utility core contained the manufactured plumbing, utilities, kitchen and bathroom appliances, mechanical and electrical systems. Interior spaces were left open for the individuals using them to design for themselves accordingly. The geodesic framework of the “Triponent House” is at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Edition:
Waltzing With Brando, Planning a paradise in Tahiti, Judge Bernard ORO Editions, San Francisco, 2011




 

Judge received an initial recognition 1960 , when its first project, “The Triponent House”, he built in the hills’ Hollywood, was published in several international journals.


In 1965, Judge started his own architectural firm, The Environmental Systems Group, with the concentration of his work in residential and commercial design, preservation and planning of facilities of the resort, with particular emphasis on the environment and local culture.

He has conducted research on housing in a dozen countries around the world, design taught and lectured on environmental design at California State University, Long Beach , California Polytechnic Institute, Pomona , University of California at Los Angeles , University of Southern California , Southern California Institute of Architecture and the University of California, Berkeley. Judge was published in architectural books and design reviews throughout the world and addressed the International Society for Reef Studies reefs. His environmental work with Marlon Brando production of the plan 1970 Master start and architectural design for Tetiaroa, Tahiti was an experience set both personally and professionally.

Over the years, reception judge received from the public who responded to the discussions on the project encouraged him to write the book published by ORO editions 2011, Waltzing with Brando.



In Waltzing with Brando, Planning a paradise in Tahiti , Judge recounts his experiences 1970 at 1975 the creation of’ sustainable village on a group of uninhabited islands and lagoon in the South Pacific for Marlon Brando, who had recently bought Tetiaroa.

The book is an illustrated account of the dynamics of the architect and the collaboration client on an ecologically and culturally rich atoll, to investigate life in nature without stripping ecology, archeology or the interdependence of marine life.



Hollywood Hills Dome. 1960 Bernard Judge & Jeffrey Lindsay

In 1968, Bernard The judge granted a patent in the United States for its innovative structural system based on a four-pole, pre-cut habitation module. His own house in the Hollywood Hills is based on this construction. Son “Triponent House”, a geodesic dome completed in 1962, was the judge of effort to find an economically viable solution to housing using the best technology journée.Il called his experimental house “Triponent” for its three intrinsic elements: envelope, core public services and interior spaces. The envelope is composed of a geodesic dome diameter 50 feet covered with transparent Mylar and shaded by photocells. The utility kernel contained the manufactured plumbing, public services, kitchen and bathroom appliances, mechanical and electrical systems. Interior spaces were left open for people who use them to design – themselves accordingly. The geodesic framework “Triponent House” is at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC.


added 13 apr. 2014
Plastic House. Hollywood United States of America.



Dome house by Bernard Judge, The Angels, CA photo by Julius Shulman

3D Hollywood_Hills



BONUS !


PLASTIC YEARS’ 40

Cosmetic plastic (1945)

Sections of a short film on the manufacturing materials plastiques.VS raw material PVC is mixed and heated. A machine produced a PVC sheet. PVC paste VS being mixed. rubber glove made with mold. VS clear plastic dome being made. Plastic tubs and sinks. MS windshield plastic on a moped. VS car being cleaned. VS manufacturing bottle caps Plastic Machinery and’ other molded. VS various things in plastic room’ exposition.


PVC polyvinyl chloride Stands: means Imperial Chemical Industries.
FILM ID: 3383,14

My first major project involving controlled geodesic domes, that serve children's park in the capital of Slovenia, Ljubljana. It's made of 4 domes, three of them are interconnected. Sizes are, 4,8 m, twice 7m and a dome’ diameter 9,5 m.


Mega Engineering Dôme Over Houston (S01E01) duration 42: 25 Documentary.



 

 
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Virginia Maneval

I am the daughter of Jean Benjamin Maneval, famous urban architect who notably created the Bulle Six Coques, a plastic house from the pop years. You can also find me on my Facebook page Bubblemania.fr or on my page La Bulle Six Coques by Jean Benjamin Maneval.

One thought on “Dôme by Bernard Judge (1931)

  1. My brother and I are the only two people I know who ever saw the bubble house in the Hollywood Hills. Amazing to find these pictures.

     

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